One of the secondary goals of our trip is to connect with individuals that have lived or are still living unique, mobile lives.  Vagabonds, Nomadic Travelers, Digital Nomads.  Whatever you call them, we are interested in connecting with individuals that are making their way through the world in unique ways.  We will be reaching out to a number of fellow travelers over the next year to share experiences and also to benefit from their wisdom.  Think you have an interesting and relevant story to share?   We’d love to hear it.  Contact us!

We hope you enjoy the posts.

Interview: Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel

Interview: Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel

After years of working 70-80 hours per week at jobs that paid the bills but brought no joy, a serious illness made Barbara Weibel realize she felt like the proverbial “hole in the donut” – solid on the outside but empty on the inside. When she recovered her health, Weibel walked away from her successful but unfulfilling career, sold or gave away most of her material possessions, strapped on a backpack and began traveling around the world in pursuit of her true passions: travel, photography and writing. These days she travels perpetually, bouncing from country to country, writing stories about her adventures on her blog, Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel (http://holeinthedonut.com) You’ve mentioned quite candidly about your troubles with your health in the past. Your travel urge really kicked into gear as a result of your failing (and subsequently improving) health. Do you think you might have taken the adventures that you have taken if you hadn’t experienced the health challenges that you did? I’ve often asked myself this same question. I’d like to say I would have eventually done it without the Lyme disease, but the truth is that I spent 36 years in corporate jobs that I hated. Every few years I’d burn out and walk away, promising myself “never again,” but I always caved in when the next job offer came my way. I really believe it took a life-threatening disease to open my eyes and push me through the fear that had always held me back from pursuing my true passions of travel, writing, and photography. Staying with the topic of health, how do...
Interview: Changes In Longitude

Interview: Changes In Longitude

After turning 50, Larissa and Michael quit their jobs, sold their house and gave away their possessions to travel around the world with a Rocky statue. (Hey, they’re from Philadelphia.) They’ve been on the road for 2+ years and after visiting six continents have become global nomads, calling the world their home. They write about their adventures for the Philadelphia Inquirer, Travel + Escape, The Huffington Post and other media outlets. You can also follow the journey on their award-winning travel blog at www.ChangesInLongitude.com. Like us, you don’t fit the typical profile of young 22 year old recent graduates that are backpacking around the world. How do you feel your age has affected either your travels, experiences or even just interactions with others that you meet while traveling? We travel a bit differently than when we were in our 20s; getting into the rhythm of slow travel and staying in places longer so we really get to know them. Sometimes seeing less but experiencing them more in-depth. We meet many locals of similar age who are fascinated about the concept of chucking it all in mid-life; making new friends around the world. One concession to age is that backpacks and hostels are out. We use wheeled suitcases and try to rent our own flats when we can. (But we’re not ancient, so don’t write us off yet!) Taking a trip like the one you are on yields many surprises. What has surprised you the most about your trip? Probably the similarities of people all over the world rather than the differences. Even though we’ve witnessed many different cultures and...